Enchanted Polish Dragon Egg

Enchanted Polish (EP) is a well-established indie brand known for their holographic and duochrome polishes. Releases are often limited, with many colors being highly sought after. Their packaging and labeling is professional and consistent, and each polish comes in its own box. There’s actually not much information about the brand on their website, so I can’t offer more than what I’ve learned since joining the indie world.

Enchanted Polish is among one of the higher priced brands, retailing for $16-$18 a bottle. Their restocks are generally a scramble, with many colors being gone (or rather, all being in carts) within a minute or two of launch. While you might have the opportunity to grab one if someone else deletes if from their cart (called a “cart drop”), they’re generally officially sold out within ten minutes or so. Prices have been extremely high on the secondary market in the past, with rare bottles going for several hundred dollars, and even relatively more common shades selling in the $20-30 range. Lately, demand seems to have cooled; there are colors that remain in stock on the site, and in the secondary market, some shades now sell at or below retail.

This week, I decided to do a mani with Dragon Egg, which was a one-time, limited edition shade, released earlier this summer. Dragon Egg is described as a juicy rose jelly with color shifting flakes and holographic pigment. I love flakies, so even though my EP collection is pretty limited, I decided this one was worth picking up.

One of my biggest frustrations with EP, which became apparent right away, is with their brush. The brush is probably the worst I’ve used. It’s very skinny, which forces you to reload the brush with more polish in the middle of doing a nail. This can be especially frustrating when the polish sets quickly, as it can cause balding (when adding polish causes the wet color underneath to pull up, and literally create bald spots). The upside to the small brush is that it allows you to paint precisely, without any polish spilling over to the cuticles. However, for an $18 polish, I expect a better brush.

Beyond my issues with the brush, I found the formula of the polish to be a bit thick. I really had to work at it to get even coverage on the nail, especially with the first coat. The second coat went on much smoother, but did still have some thicker spots. The dry time was longer than average, which I’ve found is often the case with jelly finishes. I felt I had good coverage, with no visible nail line after two coats. To finish, I topped my mani with Gelous Top Coat.

In terms of color, Dragon Egg did not disappoint. It’s a bold and deep reddish pink, that looks almost orange in some lights, and true pink in others. The shift is subtle, and I wouldn’t call it a duochrome, but it definitely has many different tones. The finish has a slightly jelly look that makes the flakes pop, but is largely opaque after two coats. I found the holographic pigment to be subtle indoors, but brilliant in the sun, and it really adds dimension to the color. What really stands out is the metallic flakes, which flash orange, gold, and green in the light, both complementing and contrasting with the rose base. It’s a beautiful shade that mimics the way dragon eggs have often been described in books and shown in film.  And in general, it looks absolutely beautiful.

Despite the problems with application and my dislike of the brush, I love the look of the polish, and I will most likely use it again. Was it worth $18? Probably not. But at the same time, I don’t regret purchasing it. I love flakie polishes, and this one is no exception.

-Abby

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